Feeds:
Posts
Comments

HE Wells autobiography

From H. E. Wells autobiography, son of James Wells and Mary Murray

When about six years of age. I have a vivid recollection of my first “home” built by my father for his family’s reception. It consisted of a double row of long saplings forming the wall, and joggled at the ends and laid at direct angles some six to eight inches apart, and the centre filled with clay “pug”, with a large doorway at one end and oil lamps and open fire at the other, with openings at each side and with calico for windows.

Later we moved to the more commodious residence in the nearby village of “Barry’s Reef” . One of our favourite games in those days was to play at “Kelly Gang”.

At the early age of 12 years, I worked with my father prospecting alluvial in the numerous creeks in the locality. I was apprenticed to a boot maker in the village and learned the rudiments of bootmaking.

A few years in the city at various jobs brings one to the disastrous Victorian depression of the early nineties when the noted land boom burst, banks failed industry lagged, all leaving in their trail unemployment, poverty, and misery through the state. I became unemployed. With a view to obtaining better condition, my father borrowed the bus fare and decided to go to Queensland.

After spending twelve months in Gympie, I returned to Melbourne. The Coolgardie goldfields were then booming, 1894. I was now 22 years of age I was penniless, and it was too far to swim. I borrowed £2/10/- from a “friend. bought a two guinea steerage passage and a four and ninepenny portmanteau and still had a cash balance of 3/3, and the prospects looked rather gloomy. I was stowed away in a bunk, the top one of three, above and alongside of the dining table which ran along the centre of the open dormitory. During our brief stay in port I visited the “City of Churches” from my still intact 33/3, I in my extravagance, drew 3/3 which I spent on oranges and a few lemons to tone up my appetite

On reaching the open seas we were immediately caught in a terrific storm and the old ship rolled, pitched and tossed, now on top of huge breakers and then down in the vortex of the howling tempestuous sea. The old vessel creaked, vibrated and groaned as if a plunge into the mighty deep would have been a welcome release. The second day out, the decks were battered down. Much deck cargo was washed overboard. And so we plodded along for eight days against heavy seas and boisterous winds across the Great Bight before reaching Albany. There, anchored ion that serene harbour, a tired crew, sick and weary passengers, all relaxed in warm, delightful sunshine.

On sitting down to breakfast I was delighted to see an old school pal and workmate who had preceded me to the West by some 6 months. He had just come down from Coolgardie with glowing stories of gold and adventure. He entreated me to return with him. He had started a boot shop and repairs ( in a tent ) in Bayley Street, where big money and prosperity was assured. The dreaded typhoid fever was then rampant on the Goldfields but nevertheless, but for a promise made to my mother on leaving home I would have returned with him.

Seeking experience and adventure ( and a little more money ) I was offered a job as a warden in the Fremantle prison and thus became a servant of His Majesty’s Government.

One year had now passed since I trod up the gang way of the old ship “Buninyong”! I had saved enough to bring my parents and brothers and sisters to this land of promise, had jobs for all who could work and saw them comfortable.

Then to the Goldfields, having a cousin working on a “show”, on the Murchison I decided to make this my destination. Boarding the old Midland train to Mingenew, I took passage on a rough buckboard coach drawn by a pair of weedy brumbies, but their stamina was wonderful;

After a tedious train journey down the Midlands, I arrived at Fremantle, spent a few days with my people, and then entrained for Coolgardie, My friend whom I spoke of earlier had asked me to undertake the management of his new Boot Shop, and I was proceeding thereto.

An attack of the dreaded typhoid fever put me out of action, and for six weeks I lay in the first iron roofed Hessian side walls, with a temperature usually over 100 in the shade. I lay helpless for days, and while I saw big strong men of 12 and 14 stone carried out, I felt confident of recovery. Robust men gave the fever something to live on, but I was a lean 10 stone, 6 ft and lived it out. It was here I met the young lady who was to be my wife a little later. This was 1898. Seeking a place to open business in the cool southern part of the state, I visited Donnybrook some 140 miles south of Perth, where a gold find was reported, then on to the coalfields of Collie.

At the time, most of the meagre population lived in tents or huts on the mining leases. All town lots were held under a ninety nine years’ lease. The town consisted of 2 hotels, 3 stores, a boarding house, post office, and a police station. This was in 1898. The Police quarters were a weatherboard hut with a tree in the yard to which culprits were then chained. A “Roads Board” was then instituted and I nominated for election. After addressing the electors, I was selected as one of its members, being the first to address a meeting of Ratepayers in the district.

During my occupancy of the Mayor Chair, I record a very pleasing and interesting incident. I related how the youth on the bakers cart in Queensland saw an engine driver elected to the State Parliament. Years later in Collie at an auspicious function, the Baker’s boy, now Mayor of the town, had the pleasure of proposing the toast of the once engine driver, now the Prime Minister, the Right Hon. Andrew Fisher.

I now felt that many public duties and my own business were getting too much for me. I sent my resignation as a Justice of the Peace to the Premier of the State, Sir Newton Moore, and received the following reply:

Compulsory military training was then in operation and a ½ company of the W.A. 16th Infantry Regiment was raised in the town. I was persuaded to apply to Headquarters for a commission, I having served previously in 1895 at Fremantle with the then volunteer West Aust. ( Imperial ) Infantry Regiment. I heard nothing of my application until the declaration of War. I received a telegram:

“Your commission gazetted, report at Blackboy camp tomorrow.”

Here was a nice position, wired reply:
“Impossible to leave business such short notice, what alternative”

Came the prompt reply:
“Report next day”

And so my soldiering days commenced

Due to a earlier leg injury Lieutenant Wells served as a quartermaster with the 44th Battalion. With them, he went to England, where he served as quartermaster with the Third Division under General Monash. Lt. Wells was promoted to Captain, and sent to Weymouth. From there, he was placed in charge of a party of 80 invalided Western Australian being sent home on a hospital ship.

Returning to Collie, I found my pre-war business had been usurped by others, so decided to try my fortune in the city of Perth. It was in this period I lost my eldest son, a bright lad of 16 years, who died of peritonitis

I joined the Victoria Park branch of the Returned Soldiers League, and was for 3 years its President. Again the “urge” for public life. I nominated and was elected a member of “Perth City Council”

I was successful and defeated a strong Labor man by 94 votes and so fulfilled the prophecy of my Sunday School address. During my three year term a disastrous depression befell Australia as well as other countries. The people clamoured for a change of government and as a result 14 government members lost their seats, including the Premier Sir James Mitchell, 2 other ministers and I was among the remainder. I had other attempts to gain lost laurels, but Labor was too strong having now held the reins of government for 9 years.

I now nominated for election for a seat on the South Perth Roads Board, and after serving several in that capacity, I resigned at the age of 75 years.

Advertisements

Descendant Indented Chart

Robert1 Wells, b. – -1600, d. – -1670
+Mary1 (–?–)
|– Dorothy2 Wells
|– Hannah2 Wells
|– Elizabeth2 Wells
|– Mary2 Wells
| +Nathaniel2 Jenkinson, m. 29-12-1720
|– Robert2 Wells
| +Hannah2 (–?–)
|– Dorothy2 Wells
|– John2 Wells
|– Deborah2 Wells
\– John2 Wells, b. – -1714
+Sarah2 Taylor, b. – -1718, m. 29-6-1735
|– Martha3 Wells
|– William3 Wells, b. 31-5-1736 in Nottingham, England
|– Mary3 Wells, b. – -1737
|– John3 Wells, b. – -1739
|– Elizabeth3 Wells, b. – -1741
\– John3 Wells, b. 25-8-1742 in Nottingham
+Elizabeth3 Tomlinson, m. 17-8-1767
|– Elizabeth4 Wells
|– Samuel4 Wells
| +Alice4 Scattergood, m. 11-11-1823
|– Thomas4 Wells, b. – -1767
| +Fanny4 Moore, m. 5-6-1791
|– John4 Wells, b. – -1769
| +Mary4 Newton, m. 19-9-1794
|– William4 Wells, b. – -1774 in Nottingham
| +Sarah Ann4 Flower, b. – -1773 in Nottingham, m. 21-8-1796
| |– Samuel5 Wells, b. in Nottingham, England
| | +Sarah5 Dodson, m. 10-9-1817
| | \– Samuel6 Wells, b. – -1836
| |– William5 Wells, b. 4-9-1797 in Nottingham, England
| |– Thomas5 Wells, b. 13-9-1799 in Nottingham, d. 30-9-1894 in Essendon, Australia, bur. 2-10-1894 in Melbourne Cemetery, Australia-Wesleyan Compartment
| | +Sarah5 Creswell, b. – -1813 in Nottingham, m. – -1829, d. 29-3-1876 in Ballarat, Australia, bur. 31-3-1876 in Ballarat, Australia
| | |– Richard6 Wells,1,2 b. 29-3-1829 in Caen, France, d. 24-4-1880 in Bunyinyong, Australia,3 bur. 27-4-1880 in
| | | +Ann Elizabeth6 Cope, b. circa – -1832 in Nottingham, England, m. – -1853
| | | |– Richard Loscoe7 Wells, b. – -1855 in Ballarat, Australia
| | | \– William Henry7 Wells, b. – -1856 in Ballarat, Australia
| | | +Alice6 Dutton, b. – -1843, m. – -1868, d. – -1915 in Durham Lead, Australia
| | | |– Alfred7 Wells,4,5 b. 17-9-1869 in Durham Lead, Australia,6 d. 14-6-1943
| | | |– Henry7 Wells, b. 31-7-1871, d. 10-11-1964
| | | | +Mary Ellen7 Baile, b. 23-8-1890, d. 24-2-1971
| | | |– Alice7 Wells, b. 14-6-1874 in Durham Lead, Australia, d. – -1932 in Sebastopol, Australia
| | | | +Duncan7 McCrimmon, b. – -1856, d. – -1975
| | | \– Arthur7 Wells, b. 14-4-1876 in Durham Lead, Australia, d. -11-1954 in Napolean, Australia
| | | +Louisa7 Coad, b. – -1883, d. – -1975
| | |– Thomas6 Wells, b. – -1830 in Normandy, France, d. 26-8-1900 in Brunswick, Australia, bur. 29-8-1900 in Melbourne, Australia
| | | +Catherine6 McIntyre, b. – -1836 in Ellinsborough, Scotland, m. circa – -1855, d. circa – -1913 in Armidale, Australia
| | | |– Sarah7 Wells, b. – -1856 in Magpie, Australia
| | | |– John7 Wells, b. – -1858 in Magpie, Australia, d. – -1858
| | | |– Frank7 Wells, b. – -1859 in Magpie, Australia, d. – -1859
| | | |– William7 Wells, b. circa – -1860 in Buninyong, Australia, d. circa – -1951 in Bentleigh, Australia
| | | | +Priscilla7 Woods, b. – -1862 in Castlemaine, Australia, d. – -1945 in Bentleigh, Australia
| | | \– Mary Agnes7 Wells, b. – -1862 in Buninyong, Australia, d. – -1908
| | | +Arthur7 Morrison, m. – -1885, d. – -1908
| | |– Rebecca6 Wells, b. 25-11-1832 in Caen, France, d. 14-9-1877 in Wentworth, Australia, bur. in Wentworth, Australia
| | | +William Burrows6 Bradshaw, b. 24-7-1826 in Ely, England, m. 15-2-1849, d. 26-5-1915 in Ballarat, Australia, bur. 28-5-1915 in Ballarat
| | | |– Charles Robertson7 Bradshaw, b. 27-1-1850 in Morphett Vale, Australia, d. -2-1880 in Gol Gol, Australia
| | | |– George7 Bradshaw, b. 7-11-1851 in Port Elliott, Australia, d. – -1851
| | | |– William7 Bradshaw, b. 18-5-1853 in Ballarat, Australia, d. 19-1-1933 in Hawthorn, Australia
| | | | +Millie Alexandria7 Holmes, b. 13-6-1864 in Inglewood, Australia, m. – -1888, d. 7-9-1963 in Sydney, Australia
| | | |– Marion Emma7 Bradshaw, b. 14-3-1855 in Ballarat, Australia, d. 30-8-1944 in Tambelup, Australia
| | | | +William7 Hillier, b. – -1854, d. – -1912 in Mildura, Australia
| | | |– Alfred Edward7 Bradshaw, b. 15-11-1856 in Black Lead, Australia, d. 30-8-1944 in Tambelup, Australia
| | | | +Mary Ellen7 Birt, b. 18-10-1864 in Euston, Australia, m. 21-4-1886, d. – -1949 in Albany, Australia
| | | |– Eugenie Matilda7 Bradshaw, b. 15-2-1858 in Beckwith, Australia
| | | | +Frederic John7 Lambert, b. 14-7-1852 in Sydney, Australia, m. – -1882
| | | |– Frederick Thomas7 Bradshaw, b. 20-6-1860 in Carisbrook, Australia, d. 7-6-1933 in Albany, Australia
| | | | +Frances Edith7 Birt, m. – -1898, d. 20-3-1944 in Albany, Australia
| | | |– Kathleen Rebecca7 Bradshaw, b. 22-4-1862 in Carisbrook, Australia, d. 20-2-1945 in Albert Park, Australia
| | | | +Frederick Arthur7 Glenie, b. 5-4-1861 in Magill, Australia, d. – -1916
| | | |– Alice Alexandria7 Bradshaw, b. 3-12-1864 in Ballarat, Australia
| | | | +Thomas7 Eldridge
| | | |– Adelaide Theresa7 Bradshaw, b. 10-5-1866 in Ballarat, Australia, d. -2-1867 in Ballarat, Australia
| | | |– Ernest Albert7 Bradshaw, b. 20-4-1867 in Ballarat, Australia, d. 1-5-1951 in Perth, Australia
| | | | +Amy7 Aparrow
| | | |– Edwin Burrows7 Bradshaw, b. – -1869, d. – -1869
| | | |– Edwin Burrows7 Bradshaw, b. – -1870, d. – -1871
| | | |– Adelaide Charlotte7 Bradshaw, b. 6-11-1872 in Bungaree, Australia, d. 1-4-1960
| | | | +Richard Ross7 Theobald, b. 6-8-1867 in England, m. 23-11-1912, d. 30-11-1950 in Mont Albert, Australia
| | | |– Oswald Buller7 Bradshaw, b. 18-10-1873 in Ballarat, Australia, d. – -1873 in Ballarat, Australia
| | | \– Oswald7 Bradshaw, b. – -1874 in Bungaree, Australia, d. – -1877
| | |– James6 Wells, b. 15-2-1833 in Calais, France, d. 2-5-1924
| | | +Mary6 Murray, b. in Glasgow, Scotland, m. circa – -1869
| | | |– Clara7 Wells, b. – -1871
| | | |– Herbert Edward7 Wells, b. – -1872
| | | |– Robert7 Wells, b. – -1874, d. – -1949
| | | |– James7 Wells, b. – -1877
| | | |– Minnie7 Wells, b. – -1878
| | | |– Ann7 Wells, b. – -1882
| | | |– Mary7 Wells, b. – -1883
| | | |– Albert7 Wells, b. – -1885
| | | \– Frederick7 Wells, b. – -1889
| | |– Sarah6 Wells, b. 24-4-1834 in Le Havre, France, d. 13-5-1910 in Essendon, Australia
| | | +Mathew6 Hutchinson, b. – -1826 in Leeds, England, m. 19-2-1859 in Bradford, England, d. 14-6-1908 in Stawell, Australia
| | | |– Harry7 Hutchinson, b. 25-3-1857 in Buninyong, Australia, d. – -1913 in Melbourne, Australia
| | | | +Mary7 George, b. – -1865 in Bunyinyong, Australia, m. 14-12-1887, d. – -1918 in Traralgon, Australia
| | | |– Emma7 Hutchinson, b. 15-1-1860 in Buninyong, Australia, d. 9-8-1943 in Kalgoorlie, Australia
| | | | +Henry7 Griffiths, b. – -1858
| | | | |– Harry8 Griffiths, b. – -1881
| | | | |– Emma8 Griffiths, b. – -1882 in Creswick, Australia
| | | | |– Almond8 Griffiths, b. – -1883 in Bunyinyong, Australia
| | | | |– Violet8 Griffiths, b. – -1884
| | | | |– Daisy8 Griffiths, b. – -1886
| | | | |– Mignonette8 Griffiths, b. – -1888
| | | | \– Myrtle8 Griffiths, b. – -1888
| | | |– William7 Hutchinson, b. 3-3-1861 in Buninyong, Australia, d. 3-2-1862 in Bunyinyong, Australia
| | | |– Albert7 Hutchinson, b. 13-7-1862 in Buninyong, Australia, d. 15-8-1929 in Healesville, Australia
| | | | +May7 McKenzie, b. 13-10-1869 in Malvern, Australia, m. – -1890
| | | |– Mathew7 Hutchinson, b. 16-4-1864 in Hiscocks, Australia
| | | |– Alice7 Hutchinson, b. 31-10-1866 in Hiscocks, Australia, d. 1-11-1902 in Kalgoorlie, Australia
| | | | +Henry7 Dodd, b. – -1858 in Ballarat, Australia
| | | | |– Agnes8 Dodd, b. – -1891 in Essendon, Australia
| | | | |– Henry Albert8 Dodd, b. – -1899 in Kalgoorlie, Australia
| | | | \– Lewis8 Dodd, b. – -1902 in Kalgoorlie, Australia
| | | |– Thomas7 Hutchinson, b. 3-6-1868 in Buninyong, Australia, d. – -1928
| | | |– Alfred7 Hutchinson, b. – -1870 in Buninyong, Australia
| | | |– William7 Hutchinson, b. 21-6-1872 in Buninyong, Australia, d. – -1961 in Bundoora, Australia
| | | \– May7 Hutchinson, b. 11-11-1877 in Buninyong, Australia, d. – -1959 in Essendon, Australia
| | |– Emma6 Wells,7,8 b. – -1836 in France,9 d. circa – -1919 in Box Hill, Australia
| | | +Isidor Louis Francis6 Yde,10,11,12,13 b. – -1820 in Belgium,14 m. circa – -1860, d. circa
| | | |– Ernest Augustus7 Yde,16,17 b. – -1861 in Scotman Lead,18 d. – -1906 in Perth, Australia
| | | | +Helen7 Green, b. – -1861 in Ballarat, Australia, m. – -1887, d. – -1941
| | | | |– Dora Emma Annie8 Yde, b. – -1888 in Richmond, Australia
| | | | |– Ernestina Ellie May8 Yde,19,20 b. – -1890 in Richmond, Australia21
| | | | |– Evelyn Muriel8 Yde,22,23 b. – -1892 in Richmond, Australia,24 d. 6-3-1953 in Springvale, Australia
| | | | |– Ernest Allan John8 Yde,25,26 b. – -1893 in Williamstown, Australia,27 d. – -1921 in Germany
| | | | |– Ivy Stella8 Yde,28,29 b. – -1895 in Lilydale, Australia,30 d. 10-6-1984 in Melbourne, Australia
| | | | |– Victor Frederick8 Yde,31,32 b. – -1896 in Lilydale, Australia,33 d. – -1897 in Lilydale, Australia
| | | | |– Una Beatrice8 Yde,34,35 b. – -1898 in Lilydale, Australia,36 d. – -1977 in Mt Lawley, Australia
| | | | |– Eunice Beryl8 Yde,37,38 b. – -1901 in Lilydale, Australia,39 d. – -1979 in Mt Lawley, Australia
| | | | \– Oscar George8 Yde,40,41 b. – -1902 in Lilydale, Australia,42 d. – -1928
| | | |– Isidor Clemence7 Yde,43,44 b. – -1865 in Bunyinong, Australia45
| | | |– Dora7 Yde,46,47 b. – -1871 in Bunyinong, Australia,48 d. – -1946 in Perth, Australia
| | | | +Paul7 Reichardt, b. – -1870, d. – -1956 in Subiaco
| | | | |– Gertrude8 Reichardt,49,50 b. – -1890 in Swansea, Australia51
| | | | |– Vinetta8 Reichardt,52,53 b. – -1892 in Geraldton, Australia54
| | | | |– Herman8 Reichardt,55,56 b. – -1895 in Geraldton, Australia57
| | | | |– Karl8 Reichardt,58,59 b. – -1895 in Geraldton, Australia60
| | | | |– Paul Ferdinand8 Reichardt, b. – -1899 in Geraldton, Australia, d. – -1983 in Manning, Australia
| | | | \– Ernest Isodore8 Reichardt, b. – -1902 in Geraldton, Australia, d. – -1949 in East Perth, Australia
| | | |– Renee Armand7 Yde,61,62 b. – -1872 in Napo, Australia,63 d. – -1940 in Perth, Australia
| | | | +Alice Beatrice Linda7 Tawkins, b. – -1876, d. – -1957 in Perth, Australia
| | | | |– Alice8 Yde, b. – -1901
| | | | |– Dora8 Yde, b. – -1903
| | | | |– Elsie8 Yde, b. – -1908
| | | | |– Eileen8 Yde, b. – -1914
| | | | \– Ernest Walter8 Yde,64,65 b. – -1916, d. 22-7-1937 in Williamstown, Australia66
| | | \– Gustave Fidelle7 Yde,67,68,69,70 b. – -1875 in Bunyinong, Australia,71 d. – -1950 in Cr
| | | +Florence Lillian7 Wilson, b. – -1874,73 d. – -1964 in Croydon, Australia74
| | |– William6 Wells, b. – -1838 in France, d. – -1925 in Gol Gol, Australia
| | | +Kate6 Bland, b. circa – -1849, m. circa – -1864, d. circa – -1935 in Merbein, Australia
| | | |– Thomas Alfred7 Wells, b. – -1865
| | | |– Amy Alice7 Wells, b. – -1867
| | | |– Gabriel Bland7 Wells, b. – -1871
| | | |– Clarence George7 Wells, b. 1-4-1873, d. -9-1925 in Gol Gol, Australia
| | | | +(–?–)7 Charlotte, d. 13-1-1958 in Gol Gol, Australia
| | | |– Ernest John7 Wells, b. – -1875
| | | |– Harriet Blanch7 Wells, b. – -1877
| | | |– May Rheeba7 Wells, b. – -1881
| | | |– William Ernest7 Wells, b. – -1884, d. – -1899
| | | \– Herbert R7 Wells, b. – -1887
| | |– John6 Wells,75,76 b. 7-11-1841 in Calais, France,77 d. 14-1-1925 in Woodstock, NZ, bur. 16-1-1925 in Hokiti
| | | +Nora Letitia6 Furness,78,79,80 b. 4-9-1854 in Castlemaine, Australia,81 m. 26-9-1871,82 d. 16-5-1
| | | |– Alice7 Wells,83,84 b. 12-1-1872 in Woodstock, NZ,85 d. 5-2-1945 in Westport, NZ, bur. 8-2-1945 in Westp
| | | | +James7 Webster, b. 23-11-1868 in Harihari, NZ, m. 30-12-1896, d. – -1948 in Westport, NZ
| | | | |– Richard John8 Webster, b. 6-9-1897, d. 9-9-1994
| | | | |– James Leslie8 Webster, b. 4-6-1899 in Woodstock, NZ, d. 8-3-1971 in Christchurch, NZ
| | | | |– Alexander Robert8 Webster, b. 17-10-1900
| | | | |– Henry Edward8 Webster, b. 17-9-1902
| | | | |– George Thomas8 Webster, b. 5-1-1905, d. 9-6-1984 in Christchurch, NZ
| | | | |– Charles Harold8 Webster, b. 16-12-1906, d. 7-7-1988 in Christchurch, NZ
| | | | \– Nora Margaret8 Webster, b. 9-2-1909
| | | |– Robert7 Wells,86,87 b. 9-6-1874 in Woodstock, NZ,88 d. 3-10-1952 in Greymouth, NZ, bur. 6-10-1952 in Gr
| | | | +Annie7 Staines, b. 3-4-1873 in Hokitika, NZ, m. 3-9-1902, d. 19-6-1924 in Greymouth, NZ, bur. 23-6-1924 in Greymouth, NZ
| | | | |– Charles Henry Westlake8 Wells
| | | | |– Margaret8 Wells, d. 19-8-1872
| | | | |– Robert Bromby8 Wells,89,90 b. 22-4-1904 in Kaniere, NZ91
| | | | \– Frances May8 Wells, b. 23-11-1912 in Hokitika, NZ, d. 21-4-1994 in Palmerston North, NZ, bur. 23-4-1994 in Palmerston North, NZ
| | | |– Richard7 Wells, b. 24-11-1875 in Woodstock, NZ, d. 13-1-1878 in Woodstock, NZ, bur. 15-1-1878 in Hokitika, NZ
| | | |– John7 Wells, b. 5-10-1876 in Woodstock, NZ, d. 11-6-1917 in Hazebrook, France, bur. – -1917 in Hazebrook, FRA
| | | |– Nora7 Wells,92,93 b. 8-1-1879 in Woodstock, NZ94
| | | | +Jack7 Symes
| | | | |– Jack8 Symes
| | | | |– James8 Symes
| | | | |– Thomas8 Symes
| | | | |– Richard8 Symes
| | | | \– Herbert8 Symes, b. – -1918
| | | |– Thomas7 Wells,95,96,97,98 b. 12-4-1881 in Woodstock, NZ,99 d. 23-4-1955 in Hokitika, NZ
| | | | +Victoria Grace7 McMillan,101,102,103 b. 22-6-1897 in Hokitika, NZ,104 m. 17-3-1919, d. 29-3-1966 in
| | | | |– Nora Margaret8 Wells, b. 12-8-1919 in Hokitika, NZ, d. 7-10-1998 in Auckland, NZ, bur. 10-10-1998 in Mt Wesley Servicemans, Dargaville,
| | | | |– Jack Stewart8 Wells, b. 15-10-1920 in Hokitika, NZ
| | | | |– Patricia Mary8 Wells, b. 21-7-1922 in Hokitika, NZ, d. 8-10-1995 in Hokitika, NZ
| | | | \– Grace8 Wells, b. 19-8-1926 in Hokitika, NZ
| | | |– Sarah Eliza7 Wells,105,106 b. 15-10-1883 in Woodstock, NZ107
| | | | +Herbert7 Bennett
| | | |– James Edmund7 Wells,108,109 b. 3-5-1886 in Woodstock, NZ,110 d. 10-8-1960 in Greymouth, NZ, bur. 12-8-1960 in
| | | |– William Creswell7 Wells,111,112 b. 23-12-1889 in Woodstock, NZ,113 d. 4-2-1964 in Woodstock, NZ, bur. 8-2-1964
| | | \– Richard Charles7 Wells,114,115 b. 19-3-1893 in Woodstock, NZ,116 d. 23-8-1980 in Woodstock, NZ, bur. 26-8-1980
| | | +Olga7 Huston, b. 19-6-1897 in Lyttelton, NZ, d. 21-1-1976 in Hokitika, NZ, bur. 24-1-1976 in Hokitika, NZ
| | | |– Gladys Letitia8 Wells, b. 11-7-1920 in Woodstock, NZ
| | | |– Richard James8 Wells, b. 3-8-1921 in Woodstock, NZ, d. 14-3-1944 in Hokitika, NZ, bur. 17-3-1944 in Hokitika, NZ
| | | |– Kenneth Huston8 Wells, b. 18-5-1923 in Woodstock, NZ
| | | |– Olga Margaret8 Wells, b. 1-9-1925 in Woodstock, NZ, d. 22-9-1989 in Hokitika, NZ
| | | |– Calvin Ford8 Wells, b. 9-1-1935 in Hokitika, NZ
| | | \– Russell Furness8 Wells, b. 8-5-1944 in Woodstock, NZ, d. 27-5-1992 in Hokitika, NZ, bur. 30-5-1992 in Hokitika, NZ
| | | +unknown spouse
| | |– Anne6 Wells, b. 8-2-1846 in Calais, France, d. circa – -1874 in Bunyinyong, Australia
| | | +Dionysius6 Wallis, b. in England, m. circa – -1868
| | | |– Alice7 Wallis, b. – -1869, d. – -1872
| | | |– Ida7 Wallis, b. – -1870
| | | |– Arlene7 Wallis, b. – -1872
| | | \– John7 Wallis, b. – -1874
| | |– Elizabeth6 Wells, b. 31-1-1848 in Calais, France
| | | +William Henry6 Waters, b. 9-7-1844, m. 10-4-1868
| | | |– Philadelphia7 Waters, b. 10-1-1869 in Bunyinong, Australia, d. 25-11-1928 in Waratah, Australia
| | | | +William John7 Godwin, b. 22-11-1864 in Ballarat, Australia, m. 9-3-1887, d. 28-6-1948 in Wynyard, Australia
| | | | |– Thomas Andrew8 Godwin, b. 19-8-1887 in Emu Bay, Australia
| | | | |– Elizabeth Ann8 Godwin, b. 13-4-1889
| | | | |– William John8 Godwin, b. 19-10-1891 in Waratah, Australia
| | | | |– Albert Edward8 Godwin, b. 13-1-1895 in Waratah, Australia, d. 24-8-1983 in Sydney, Australia
| | | | |– Pauline Victoria8 Godwin, b. 10-3-1896 in Waratah, Australia, d. 24-9-1985 in Melbourne, Australia
| | | | |– Herbert Philip8 Godwin, b. 26-1-1899 in Goulds Country, Australia
| | | | |– Eva Delphie8 Godwin, b. 16-12-1900
| | | | \– Bertha Alice8 Godwin, b. 22-9-1902
| | | |– Edward7 Waters, b. – -1870 in Bunyinong, Australia
| | | |– Thomas7 Waters, b. – -1872, d. – -1873
| | | |– Annie7 Waters, b. – -1874
| | | |– William7 Waters, b. – -1876 in Barrys Reef, Australia
| | | |– Margaret7 Waters, b. 13-11-1880 in Emu Bay, Australia
| | | |– Alice7 Waters, b. 10-10-1883 in Emu Bay, Australia
| | | |– John7 Waters, b. 31-8-1885 in Waratah, Australia
| | | \– Henry7 Waters, b. 30-3-1889
| | |– Eliza6 Wells, b. 25-7-1850 in Adelaide, Australia, d. circa – -1936 in Fitzroy, Australia
| | | +James William6 Geddes, m. – -1868
| | | |– Inez7 Geddes, b. – -1869, d. – -1929
| | | |– Eliza Mary7 Geddes, b. – -1871, d. – -1939
| | | |– Henry Edmund7 Geddes, b. – -1873, d. – -1876
| | | |– Thomas7 Geddes, b. – -1876
| | | |– William7 Geddes, b. – -1878
| | | |– Francis7 Geddes, b. – -1883
| | | \– Clara Mary7 Geddes, b. – -1885
| | |– Alice6 Wells, b. – -1852 in Adelaide, Australia, d. – -1896 in Ballarat, Australia
| | | +William6 Perry, m. – -1873, d. – -1902
| | | |– Francis John7 Perry, b. – -1875, d. – -1881
| | | |– Alice May7 Perry, b. – -1877, d. – -1919
| | | | +Francis John7 Johnston, d. – -1922
| | | | |– John8 Johnstone, b. – -1903, d. – -1970
| | | | |– Norma8 Johnstone, b. – -1904, d. – -1965
| | | | |– Kathleen8 Johnstone, b. – -1906, d. – -1951
| | | | |– Adeline Muriel8 Johnstone, b. – -1911
| | | | |– Sheila8 Johnstone, b. – -1914, d. – -1963
| | | | \– Francis Perry8 Johnstone, b. – -1917, d. – -1990
| | | |– Adeline Emily7 Perry, b. – -1883
| | | \– William Reynolds7 Perry, b. – -1888, d. – -1890
| | |– Fanny6 Wells, b. 21-6-1854 in Adelaide, Australia, d. – -1889 in Prahran, Australia
| | \– Frederick6 Wells, b. – -1857 in Buninyong, Australia, d. – -1942 in Ballarat, Australia
| | +Sarah Louisa6 Lloyd, b. – -1857 in Bunyinyong, Australia, m. – -1878, d. – -1897 in Durham Lead, Australia
| | |– Sarah Jane7 Wells, b. – -1878
| | |– Frederick John7 Wells, b. – -1882, d. – -1894
| | |– Emma7 Wells, b. – -1884, d. – -1961
| | |– Ralph7 Wells, b. – -1886
| | |– Louisa Eveleigh7 Wells, b. – -1889
| | |– John Robert7 Wells, b. – -1891
| | \– George William7 Wells, b. – -1893
| | +unknown spouse
| |– Richard5 Wells, b. – -1801 in Nottingham, England
| | +Ann5 Wardley, m. 5-12-1825
| |– Elizabeth5 Wells, b. 22-4-1809 in Nottingham, England
| \– Mary Ann5 Wells, b. 18-12-1812 in Nottingham, England
| +Richard5 Allcott, m. 23-6-1830
| +unknown spouse
|– Samuel4 Wells, b. – -1780 in Nottingham, England
|– Richard4 Wells, b. – -1782
|– Elizabeth4 Wells, b. – -1786
\– Ann4 Wells, b. – -1789
+Charles4 Leavers, m. 20-6-1815

Printed on: 1 Apr 2009
Prepared by:
hugh winters
09 2782557
http://homepages.ihug.co.nz/~hughw

Fwd: YDE & WELLS

Dear Mr Wells, (or should it be Winters?)
                      My name is Robert Hughes but more important to you would be that my mother-in-law's maiden name was YDE.
            She was descended from Isidor YDE who was born 1820 / 1821 in Vervicq-Sud on the French bank of the river Lys. Opposite it on the Belgian side is its twin town, called Zuid Wervik.
            Isidor YDE migrated to Port Philip Bay in Victoria where he disembarked from the "MARIAN MOORE" on the 10th of March 1854.
            In 1860 in Buningyong, near Ballarat, he married Emma WELLS, whose family had migrated to Adelaide, South Australia in 1848. In 1854 they migrated overland to Victoria where they originally settled near what is now called Lake Wendouree. They became a well-established family in that district but descendants later spread wider, mostly throughout Australia, but one, John, left the area in 1865 and founded a family in N.Z. He must be an ancestor of yours.
            Naturally, I am most interested in the Ydes but there are gaps in my knowledge and some things which are probably correct, but do lack definite proof.
            For instance, I believe Isidor's parents were a Jean-Baptiste (+ possibly, Louis Francois) YDE and a daughter of a VERSAVEL. Her second name was Therese. (We shifted house recently and I've not been able to find my folder of YDE family notes.)
            I know that somewhere I found that Isidor's father owned a livery stable in Calais (or in the Pas de Calais).
            My brother-in-law, John Murphy, tells me that ;- 1. Isidor had been brought up by a pair of maiden aunts.
                                                                                 2. He saw service in the Spahis, in the French army — a camel corps, not necessarily in the desert, although the French Foreign Legion did have French officers.
                                                                                 3. Isidor was a secretary to the French Consul in Australia. This I've found a bit hard to swallow; however there could be a fact(s) of some sort that might give us an acceptable reason for what he was told
            All three of the above were told to John and / or to Glenis, my wife, by their mother, Dora, and if you have some knowledge of them, and better still, evidence, I'd be very happy to hear of it.
            I suspect that a cousin of Glen, by the name of John GOLDSMITH, has already been in touch with you, because he recently sent me a copy of Isidor's naturalization papers from 1878 when they were resident in Stawell, Vic. At the same time he attached a full history of the WELLS family originally from Nottingham (lacemakers), later France, then Australia.
            Among Isidor & Emmas's children was Armand / Amand who had a son named Rene whom I suspect was the first YDE of the family to come to Western Australia — He managed a soap factory in North Fremantle. One of their daughters and her husband also settled in Fremantle.
            About three or four years ago I became aware that there was an YDE Family History Society in N.Z. so I wrote to its given address but I got no reply.
            I look forward to hearing from you and to being able to answer any questions you might have for me.
               
            Yours faithfully,
            Robert (Bob) Hughes.        
 

Surname WELLS
Given Name Thomas
Category Nominal Roll Vol. 1
Regimental Number 6/2333
Rank Private
Body or Draft Fifth
Unit or Regiment Canterbury Infantry Batln
Marital Status S
Last NZ Address Woodstock
Next of Kin Title John
Next of Kin Surname WELLS
Next of Kin Relationship Father
Next of Kin Address Woodstock Westland


West Coast Times Thursday 11 November 1865

The Sydney Morning Herald of the 2nd.

There is clearly a fresh rush to Hokitika. From our gold fields and from the
coal mining districts of the Hunter, there is an exdous going on to the new
Eldorado. Private letters giving accounts of great success have had there
natural effect, and with that faith in his own good luck which every man
seems more or less to possess, many are preparing themselves for a venture.
The accounts published in the newspapers, however, do not warrant any hasty
movement. They speak of the new diggings as already overcrowded and rather
warn than invite fresh arrivals. The editor or reporter on the spot comes
across the unlucky as well as the lucky; and sometimes finds the former far
the more communicative. That the west coast of New Zealand is a goldfield
has already been proved. Although there may be plenty of gold, mining must
be carried on to a great disadvantage, owing to the climate, the cost of
living, and the abscene of good harbors. Both capitalist and laborers are in
such a case the sanguino pioneers, often at ruinous cost to themselves,
young countries are peopled and developed. Others reaped where they sowed.
Such sanguine pioneers seen essential to the rapid progress of any country.
Where everybody is too prudent to run any risk, everything is very stagnant,
and possible fountains of wealth remain unsealed. The gold-diggers are the
enterprising laborers of our community and do a work corresponding to that
of enterprising capitalists, and their apparent freshness has done wonders.
Hundreds have failed and lost all, yet on the whole the gold-diggers have
achieved marvellous success – a success that would not have been possible if
they had always been as prudent and cautious as virtue requires. The
“Herald” takes a sensible view of the exodus of miners from NSW “We are
sorry to see so many able-bodied men leaving our colony, but if they can
better themselves by doing we are not entitled to discountenance their
departure. We draw men from the old country to better their fortunes, and if
they can secure that betterment in one part of Australasia more than
another, it is for them to go where they can best realise the purpose of
their emigration. Anything like jealousy on the part of one colony at the
temporary prosperity of another is out of place, and it is as narrow minded
as it is ingenerous. The prosperity of any one is sure to prove in the long
run the prosperity of all, and the adversity of one the adversity of all.
Yet while we do not grudge New Zealand its golden treasures, we cannot but
think that if a little of the energy that is expanded by some of our people
in running away to the other countries were expended in developing our own
resources, the temptation to run away would be considerably diminished. But
there is a charm in distance, in novelty, and in the chance of great
prizes.”

A man may be justified in running the risk of loss, of peril, and of
hardships, in hope of making better provision for himself and family. But he
is not justified in leaving his wife and children to the risk of starvation.
The digger pursuing his fortunes has too often forgotten those who ought to
be his constant thought. On no principle of morality is a man justified in
leaving his wife and children to public or private charity while he goes off
to make his pile. Yet it is a thing that is done at every rush. Those who
have the management of our charitable institutions know the vast amount of
want and misery that has been caused by the wholesale desertion of families.
Out of sight, out of mind.

West Coast Times Saturday 18 November 1865

Article. Travelling along the Beach from Hokitika to the Grey.
The dull everlasting roar of the surf, varied only by the scream of the
seagull, giving rise to anything but a cheerful train of thought, and
causing the first view of a human habitation to be a positive relief. There
was no lack of company, the beach lined with pedestrians, heavily laden with
digger’s paraphernalia, nearly all of whom had their faces turned
Grey-wards. The forest is smooth and unbroken in appearance. This could be
caused only by a wonderful uniformity in the length of the timber, from the
top of which spreads that dense mass of foliage…. Five miles from town,
and the Arahura River is reached. There being plenty of boats plying to
convey travellers across. The ordinary charge is 6d, but when the river is
swollen by a freshet, double fare is demanded as compensation for the extra
trouble and risk. Here there are three public-houses and a store. The
establishment wherein I obtained my noonday meal was presided over by a
bustling landlady, a good-tempered and communicative, who confessed to more
years of colonial than the generality of ladies care about acknowledging.
She showed herself perfectly conversant with the wants of the hungrey souls
who chose to patronise her establishment, serving us a good substantial
meal, which she seasoned with some of her past experiences in Victoria and
elsewhere. There is no mistaking the thorough colonial women when you meet
them. Hardened by rough usage, they at first sight appear obtrusive, which,
however, is more than made up by heartiness of demeanor, sterling
hospitality, and a desire to oblige.

http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~nzbound/hokitika.htm


Potential (14 day free trial) 468x60

Taken from Mal Williams on “Gencircles”

Individual:
Melbourne General Cemetery, Wesleyan Compartment F Grave 1015(no
headstone)TAKEN FROM “THE SOUTH AUSTRALIAN REGISTER”: Adelaide: Wed
nesday, September 6, 1848 and later reprinted in A HOBART NEWSPAPER,
TASMANIA: Wednesday Evening, Sept. 20, 1848 under the heading COLONIAL
INTELLIGENCE

THE EMIGRANT SHIP “HARPLEY”
(Supplied by Miss D Smith, 21 Corella Ave, Glenalta SA 50 52)

This fine colonial-built ship took her departure from Deptf ord on the
12th May, and sighted Kangaroo Island on Tuesday the 20th August, at
four in the morning. Remarkably inauspicious weather retarded the
arrival within our harbour precincts, and eventually obliged Captain
Buckland to trust to his cables and anchors in Holdfast Bay. During
the terrific gale on Friday night, the twice parting of the small
bower cable obliged the captain to have recourse to a chain cable on
board, on freight, which by the help of the emigrants was got up and
happily rendered conducive to the safety of the ship, the best bower
holding on in the meantime, and confirming the good repute of the
“holding ground” at the anchorage.

The circumstancial history of the bulk of the migrants pe r “Harpley”
is worthy of a particular notice. With the exception of six. families,
those on board the “Harpley” had been employed in French lace
manufactories in or near Calais, some of them having been there eight
years since they left their native place, Nottingham. At the outbreak
of the French revolution the popular fury soon extended to the
hitherto peaceful abodes of the refugees, and the cry of “a has les
Anglais”(down with the English) would possibly have been followed by
actual and violent expulsion but for the timely interference of the
Consul, who besought the insurgents at least to respect the persons of
the English workmen. At that time, the number of English working for,
or dependent upon, manufacturing employers in Calais and its environs
was nothing short of a thousand souls; of whom some have gone to
Sydney, a few more are coming hither, and a ship-load were to embark
at Calais for Port Philip, a fortnight after the “Harpley” left.

In their extremity the English work people in Calais not wi lling to
return to their native town of Nottingham, or any other part of the
over-stocked English labour-market, sent a memorial to Lord
Palmerston, dated April 12, desiring to obtain passages to one of the
English colonies, and a large number wishing to make choice of South
Australia, of which they professed to have heard through our “Voice”.
In three days, an answer was returned by his Lordship, and a
government Commissioner arrived to make the requisite enquiries. He
was immediately succeeded by Mr. Cooper, a gentleman from the Office
of Her Majesty’s Land and Emigration Commissioners, who instituted
diligent scrutiny into the characters and circumstances of the
memorialists, and then arranged for their passage to England,
preparatory to emigration for these colonies. On their arrival in
London they learned that a benevolent committee was sitting daily at
the Mansion House, under the auspicies of that genuine specimen of
nobility the distinguished Lord Ashley, and eagerly engaged in getting
up a generous subscription to which the town of Nottingham contributed
300 to 400 pounds for the relief of those who were hourly compelled to
return to England from the French territory. The objections of the
Commissioners to send lace makers and their families to a young colony
like South Australia were compromised by an allowance of 5 pounds per
head from the subscription fund, and an engagement to provide a good
outfit.

The details were then arranged, and the “Harpley” appointed , the
emigrants embarked, and soon the poop of the ship, to use our
informant’s words, was “transformed into a haberdasher’s shop”, from
which every thing necessary was gratuitously and unsparingly supplied
to those who were in need, Mr. Cooper being charged with Lord Ashley’s
princely commands to let the unfortunates want for nothing. Mr
Commissioner Wood visited them at Gravesend previous to their
departure, addressed to them an admirable speech full of kindness and
encouragement, assuring them they were proceeding to a land where
honesty and industry seldom failed to have their proper reward.

The only instance of death among the adults was an aged an d ailing
man (in his 67th year) who was unwilling to be separated from his
family, and to whom the Commissioner humanely granted a free passage.
He died in traversing the Bay of Biscay, the only instance of
mortality besides, being a delicate infant of three months old. A sea
apprentice and a young sailor named Bateman fell overboard during the
passage, but both were saved by a well-directed life-buoy until they
could be picked up. During the passage the ship only sighted the Cape
Verd Islands and St. Pauls. The passengers, who were scarcely becalmed
on the line, suffered little from heat in the Tropics, and as little
from cold in the southern hemisphere, 39.5 S being the most southerly
latitude attained. There was no case of serious illness during the
greater part of the passage, and 236 souls have arrived in excellent
health, in a remarkably clean and well-commanded ship, manned by a
fine crew. During the passage Mr. Spencer the Surgeon-Superintendent
read prayers every Sabbath when the weather permitted.

We have seen in the hands of the refugee Emigrants, some o f the
certificates granted by employers and municipal officers in France,
and they speak well for the character of the people, who we hope will
find they have exchanged the inhospitable treatment of the French for
a hearty welcome in a British colony. Their’s is an instance calling
for especial sympathy and spirited exertion on behalf of the
colonists, and we shall much mistake if the newly-arrived do not in
their case confirm the assurance, that any honest men and women who
venture to South Australia with their off-spring will be likely to
find the right hand of fellowship extended towards them in a land of
peace and plenty.

We have elsewhere published the names and shall be exceedin gly glad
to assist, through our office, in facilitating engagements between
employers and those who assure us they are anxious to make themselves
useful in any capacity.

SHIPPING INTELLIGENCE:

ARRIVED…. Saturday, September 2nd – The ship “Harpley” 5 7 ?tons,
Buckland, master, from London.
Passengers:
Dr John Spencer, surgeon superintendent, and John Spencer , in the
cabin; and the following refugee emigrants from France – John Barnet,
wife and six children, John Brown, wife and four children, Wm Burgess,
wife and four children, Joseph Clarke, wife and child, John Clarke,
wife and three children, Wm Cobb, wife and two children, Henry Cope,
wife and seven children, Joseph Cope, Ann Cope, Henry Cope jnr, ?Fanny
Cope, Wm Cope, Cornelius Crowder and wife, Hannah Crowder, Emma
Crowder, Mary Crowder, George Dennisthorpe, John Davis, wife and four
children (one born on the passage), Mary Ann Dennisthorpe, Richard
Dixon, wife and two children, Sarah Dixon, Richard Dixon jun, David
Dixon, Joseph Dixon, George Dormer, wife and six children, Thomas
Dormer, Ellen Dormer, Thomas Dunk, wife and five children, John
Freestone, wife and five children, Richard Goldmark, wife and four
children, Jas. Hall, wife and child, John Hemmingway, wife and two
children, Wm Hirold and wife, John Hibbert and wife, Humphrey Hopkins,
wife and adult daughter Mary, Philip Hickey, wife and two children,
James Henslie, Caroline Henslie, John Henslie, Benjamin Holmes, wife
and three children, Hariet Holmes, John Irons, wife and child, Joseph
James, wife and two children, Edward Lander, wife and six children
(one born at sea) and Mary Ann (adult), Henry Lee, wife and child,
Hiram Langmore, wife and five children, Matthew Matthew, wife and
three children, John Mountaney, wife and three children, Thomas and
George (adults), Emma Needham, Wm Paul and wife, Wm Parsons, wife and
seven children, Sarah, John and Ellen, adults (the youngest, three
months old died at sea), Louisa Peat, Emily Peat, George Pike, wife
and child, John Revel, wife and three adult daughters (Elizabeth, Anne
and ?Mel…sen), Wm Henry Sanson and wife, John Sanson, wife and four
children, William Sanson, Jane Sanson, Thomas Sibley and wife, John
Shaw, John Smith, wife and four children (one Mary Ann, adult), Thomas
Street, wife and four children, Wm Stubbs, wife and three adult
children (Francis, Robert, Henry and Edward), George Saunders, wife
and three children, Elizabeth (adult), John Sweeney, Theresa Sweeney,
Mary Ann Sweeney, Robert Taylor, Walter Wells wife and seven children,
Henry and John (adults), Thomas Wells, wife and ten children, Sarah,
Richard, Thomas and Rebecca (adults), Thomas Widderson, wife and six
children, Henry Watts, Charles Richmond, wife and eight children,
Henry and Eliza (adults), Esther Samuels.

THE SHIP – THE HARPLEY
The information is taken from “Blue Gum Clippers and Whal e Ships of
Tasmania”, a book by Will Lawson and The Shiplovers’ Society of
Tasmania, published by Georgian House, Melbourne in 1949… and
borrowed from my ship loving neighbour Vic Brownlie who has a whole
library of ship books! Thanks to Vic.

THE HARPLEY (page 151)
Fired no doubt by the spirit of competition and not wishin g to see
the bulk of the London trade handled by Hobart ships, the people of
Launceston became possessed in 1847 of a fine ship, only 15 tons
smaller than the Tasman and, moreover, built on the Tamar.
This was the Harpley, 545 tons, owned by James Raven and bu ilt by
Patterson Brothers. She left Launceston early in 1847, with a full
cargo of wheat and wool, and reached Hobart, where she had to pick up
as passengers 50 soldier pensioners, 26 women and 40 children, on
March 26. She sailed again on March 29, under the command of Captain
Buckley, and made a good passage. It was a shock to the owners and
builders when their ship, on arrival at London, was condemned by
Lloyd’s surveyors as unfit to carry emigrants, some of her beams being
declared to be rotten. In a new ship this was inexplicable, and seemed
to point to some prejudice against colonial-built vessels.
Hobart Town master builders and merchants were very jealou s of the
good name that their blue gum vessels had earned in all parts of the
world, and they talked of loading one of the oldest vessels and
sending her to London for Lloyds to take her to pieces and satisfy the
English authorities that blue gum built ships were second to none,
including English oak and teak. One of the shipbuilders went to
Launceston to make enquiries and found that the Harpley had been built
of swamp gum, which southern builders considered totally unfit for
ship building.

JOHN PATTERSON OF PATTERSON BROTHERS (page 139)
This builder turned out the largest vessel to be built on t he Tamar
and the second largest in Tasmania – the barque Harpley, of 545 tons.
She was launched to the order of James Raven, a merchant of
Launceston, on Feb 5, 1847. Her length on keel was 133 feet.
The firm’s yards were at Blackwell where, in 1848, they bui lt a
schooner of 130 tons, and in 1851 launched the schooner Pearl, 200
tons, for Charles Weedon and John Griffiths….!DEATH:Victoria
Australia 6100\1808

Extract from a letter to Mignon Preston [descendent from Sarah (nee
Wells) Hutchinson, the fifth child of Thomas and Sarah (nee Cresswell)
WELLS], written by Elizabeth Simpson FSG, “Peapkin’s End”, 2 Stella
Grove, Tollerton, Nottingham NG12 4EY England… dated 30 Sept
1986….(includes references to John Boyland, 3 Eggeling St, Esperance
WA 6450, also descendent from Sarah).

…the colony of South Australia – celebrating their 150 years this
year, had hoped to hold a big meeting of descendants of all those who
had arrived per the Harpley in 1848. A letter was published in the
newspaper THE ADVERTISER on 20 Sept 1983 written by a Mr John
Donisthorpe, 26 Adelaide St, Magill SA 5072 asking folk so descended
to get into touch with him. I also gave him the address of the
secretary of the Lacemakers Association which was formed in Sydney
several years ago, Mrs Gillian Kelly, 10 Sorrell Place, Queanbeyan,
NSW 2620. I would urge you to get into touch with Gillian … she is
at present doing a BA in Applied History and using the arrival of the
Nottingham/Calais Lacemakers to her thesis. She is intensely
interested in what happened to them all after their arrival and I know
she would like to hear from you with the story of the WELLS family.

Their search for the right place and occupation to follow tells such a
lot about their plight. The lot who landed at Adelaide came to a
colony only 10 years old – they were sophisticated folk who had led a
very good life in Calais – they were used to travelling, but in a
superior way – they were fairly affluent – their work in France paid
off – they were better off than their families left at home in
Nottingham – they grasped at the straw and hope of ‘going to
Australia’ because they feared that revolution was about to break out
in France again in real earnest – trade was very bad at home – they
would have had to go onto the Poor Law and seek relief – no jobs – no
where to live save possibly back at home (very cramped) with any
relatives still there – they appealed to be sent to Australia – at
this time all she wanted was labourers – farmers in particular –
domestic servants, menial posts – they DID not want lacemakers… who
was wearing lace?

It was a minor miracle that they were allowed to go – their arrival
must have shattered them! What had they come to? It has always been my
belief that the coming of the gold rush so soon after their arrival
was the salvation of a lot of them – a boom was created and through
this they could learn how to survive. I am thus delighted to see that
this is exactly what helped the WELLS family.

…. Walter Wells I have not linked to Thomas – but it is very likely
that they ARE related. The lacemakers who went to France went as
family units – extended family units – and they recruited more of
their own kin all the time. The names are too close to be ignored –
and the coincidence of both being on the Harpley helps too to
strengthen the idea that they belong to each other – I suspect that
they are probably brothers – or at the very least first cousins. Work
needs to be done on the background of the Wells in Nottingham. Up to
now I only do this kind of work if asked to by Australian descendants
– I don’t have the time to spare just to potter about on my own too
much! I used to work a lot on these Lacemakers – but I have had two
whole years off ill…. which brought my activities to a total
halt….. I am pleased to find that the descendants of these
lacemakers have not lost all hope and are still actively interested in
their incredible story.

I shall be in Sydney for the bi-centenary in 1988 and it is possible
that I will deliver a paper on these lacemakers. It is a story which
has to be told – a unique migration of a very particular group of
people. Nothing like it has occurred anywhere else in the world – I am
delighted and proud that I was the one to bring it to the notice of
the Australian people in the first place.

.. extra info…(from Elizabeth Simpson)

Walter & Sophia WELLS baptised a bunch of their kids all together at
the ‘English’ church in Calais: Robert, Elizabeth Maria, Edward
Howell, Walter & Winifred on 16th November 1847… no ages given for
the kids but the name HOWELL might be a help..

The CRESWELLS were also in Calais: There was a Charles Bilston
CRESSWELL born France c1828 (details per 1851 census of Wednesbury,
Staffs. He was living in the home of his Mother Ann who was then 59
and a widow. He was a ‘fitter of steam engines’ – had a wife called
Harriet who was born Birmingham c1830.

A David CRESSWELL born c1792 was buried in Calais 3rd January 1842 aged 50.

A Rebecca CRESSWELL, the daughter of a DAVID, married a Levi TURNER on
22 Nov 1842 in Dover.

A Rebecca CRESSWELL daughter of David married Thomas TODD 19 Nov 1838 in Dover.

Ann WELLS daughter of Thomas & Sarah (Cresswell) – birth registered in
civil records Calais 8 Feb 1846 – father then aged 42, mother 30.
Residence rue Lafayette, section G No 470. Witnesses Charles GIRUAD 37
lacemaker, Reuben Jennings 37 lacemaker.

Lucy WELLS bapt Calais 27 Feb 1826 daughter of William and Charlotte.

James WELLS son of Thomas & Sarah (Cresswell) birth reg 15 Feb 1833
Calais, residence as above. Witnesses John Webster 35 and Henry Hill
25.

John WELLS son of Walter & Sopies (Basford) birth registered 15 Feb
1833 Calais, residence: rue Lafayette Section G No 364. Witnesses John
BASFORD 38 and John Vicary 36.

Sophia WELLS daughter of Walter & Sopiea buried 1 Oct 1841 Calais died
29 Sept 1841 aged 6 months.

William Henry WELLS son of Walter & Sophia (Basford) birth reg 3 Nov
1830 Calais. Witnesses Robert William Pechell 39 and James Trees.

SNIPPETT (taken from Tulle magazine, November 1998 pg26)

In 1841, according to the census of Calais, Rachael Basford, nee
Stevens, and the widowed mother of Sophie Wells, was living with her
youngest son George, in the home of Thomas Goldfinch and his first
wife, Anne Farley.

– – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – –
– – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – –
– – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – –
– – – – –

Sources

Title: Sourced from Bronwyn Thomas

Title: VIC BDM Register
Author: Registry of Births Deaths & Marriages Victoria
Publication: A database of births, deaths and marriages recorded by th
e Registry of Births,Deaths and Marriages, Victoria.
Page: 1894/13059
Quality: 3

Title: Of All The Mad Pursuits
Author: Mignon Preston
Publication: T & M Preston


hugh
papatoetoe, new zealand
http://homepages.ihug.co.nz/~hughw
researching Winters, Wells, Benger, Le Blond, Hayes, Davern and Furness

Surname WELLS
Given Name      Thomas
Category        Nominal Roll Vol. 1
Regimental Number       6/2333
Rank    Private
Body or Draft   Fifth
Unit or Regiment        Canterbury Infantry Batln
Marital Status  S
Last NZ Address Woodstock
Next of Kin Title       John
Next of Kin Surname     WELLS
Next of Kin Relationship        Father
Next of Kin Address     Woodstock Westland

       The above is whats on the CD, all I can add is he Left New Zealand 13th
June 1915.

From the Main Body through to the 8th Reinforcements a pretty much on the CD
except the embarkation dates.